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The Queen is Coming—Act Social

The Queen is Coming—Act Social

CrownWhen Queen Elizabeth II turned 90 last April, she didn’t just get a nice sheet cake with some grocery store flowers. Oh no. Instead, the country embarked on a two-month holiday bender that concluded with an “official” June 11 birthday celebration featuring a military parade and fighter-jet flyby.

But the queen’s birthday raises an interesting question: What do you give the monarch who owns approximately one-sixth of the world? What could she possibly need?

Turns out there is one thing—help with her social media.

That’s right: Her Majesty is in the market for a new digital engagement manager.

Why call the pros?

While at first blush this move may seem slightly absurd, its reasoning is “sound as a pound.” There are plenty of reasons why the queen—or anyone with a busy schedule and elevated office—should hire a professional media professional. Let’s look at the facts:

– Relationships are managed digitally these days. Even the queen, at 90 years of age, recognizes that a hefty portion of our relationships—personal and professional—are now maintained through digital means. Anyone who values their business relationships, knows they must maintain a stellar social presence in order to stay in touch with their audience (or subjects).

– Busy folks need assistance. Last year the queen attended 341 engagements— 35 of them overseas. She may have just a little too much on her plate to be stressing over, say, why Instagram keeps crashing when she tries to upload photos of her beloved corgis. Your business endeavors are likely time consuming as well—and surely your time could be better spent pursuing more strategic tasks.

– The larger your audience, the greater your need to stay connected. The queen has many followers, with or without social media. She’s so big that some publications just call her “the Queen”—one word, capitalized. Anyone who has as much pull as she does needs to be accessible to her subjects (around 143 million of them). Doubters need only look at another powerful—and popular—proponent of digital connectedness: Pope Francis, who has declared social media to be no less than a gift from God. 

– News cycles quickly and in many different places. The queen knows her business. Ever the practical world leader, the queen knows that a robust social media presence will keep her relevant in this age of increasingly fragmented news sources.

– Social media stands to gain all sorts of informational goodies. “Probably what is really of interest to [the queen] is… the data analytics of ‘who is following us, who is engaged, are they young, are they old, are they female, male, what region and where are their opportunities?’ That’s just good business acumen today,” said Yvette Adams, founder of the Creative Collective, to ABC News.

– Well executed social requires finesse. Communicating to large audiences in a digital arena and in a truly authentic fashion is easier said than done. Faux pas can be costly, and sometimes it’s just better to leave it to the experts.

Nerves and knowhow

Enter HMSMM (Her Majesty’s social media manager). The candidate will earn around $92,000 a year, enjoy 33 days off annually, and be provided a free lunch every day (wild guess: probably not a bologna sandwich and bag of chips).

That said, the position won’t be without a certain amount of, shall we say, great expectations. To the contrary, in order to succeed, the new digital director will need the icy-veined precision of a tightrope walker and a stiff upper lip (in a household famous for them).

But the power of social media delivers both high rewards and increased risks. A seasoned social media expert knows that—and in fact will thrive on it. That’s one of the reasons why you rely on professionals in the first place. (A recent Entrepreneur article echoes this: In “7 Social Media Tips for Non-Tech Entrepreneurs,” their No. 1 tip is “consider retaining an expert.”)

Hey, thanks, m’lady

Maybe there’s something to that whole age-and-wisdom thing after all, because at 90 the queen seems to have pretty well figured things out—she knows that half the battle of getting by nowadays is knowing what you don’t know, then knowing someone who knows what you don’t know so they can know it for you. You know?

Especially if you’re a busy, dynamic person trying to stay relevant while also finding a way to appreciate the finer things in life. If a connected, all-powerful monarch can deign to ask for help with her social media, maybe we common folk can take a page or two from her royal playbook and seek assistance as well.

With the queen’s sterling example to guide us, at least we can learn to manage our social media like civilized people (and hopefully with a certain amount of decorum).